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Blue Faux Oak Woodgraining – A How To

Grand Illusion Decorative Painting had the opportunity to head to Nantucket for a 4-day long job. An interior designer had envisioned blue oak wood graining to include in their client’s living space.  The finished panels are an example of a “fantasy” grain,  GIDP took some liberties on this particular project because of the non-traditional blue color but made sure to leave a realistic finish.

Below, the finished product looks like oak but because the client asked for blue, it gave GIDP some artistic license.  Importantly the wood grain still looked like realistic oak and became a classy addition to the client’s living space. Typically, woodgrain finishes are completed in a 3-layer process; 1- background, 2- graining, 3- overglazing.  The finish in this post is similar to these typical layers because the blue basecoat is acting as the background layer.  Pierre Finkelstein of Grand Illusion Decorative Painting shows you how he created this finish. Note: This post does not describe the woodgraining process but the progression of completing a paneled area in sections.

See also: Steps for Oak Graining, Oak Graining Tools. Order to Paint a Room, Woodgrain Layout for an Interior Space

HOW TO CREATE THIS FINISH

Use our step-by-step instruction below

MATERIALS NEEDED:

Here is a list of the tools & supplies you will need to achieve this technique.  Supplies available at fauxbrushes.com are linked below and listed at the bottom of the page.

1

APPLY BACKGROUND BASECOAT

STEP 1 – APPLY BACKGROUND:  First, to ensure proper preparation, the Basecoat was applied. Two coats of blue oil-based paint were sprayed onto all areas.

2

DIVIDE WIDE PANELS INTO SECTIONS

STEP 2 – DIVIDE WIDE PANELS INTO SECTIONS:  Next, all of the panels were divided into sections with blue painter’s tape- just as they would have been for real oak.  

3

GRAINING LAYER - APPLY TO ALTERNATING PANELS

STEP 3 – GRAINING LAYER – APPLY TO ALTERNATING PANELS:  In this case, the technique required a fast drying time a faster drying medium was used.  Paints used in this woodgrain technique are primarily fluid Acrylic Colors with a proportion of acrylic Glazing Medium.  Depending on how big the project is, the use of slow-dry colorants and mediums are used to achieve the correct viscosity and open time. 

4

GRAINING LAYER - APPLY TO MANTLE

STEP 4 – GRAINING LAYER – APPLY TO MANTLE:  After the panels, the mantle was next.

5

RAINING LAYER - APPLY TO STILES

STEP 5 – RAINING LAYER – APPLY TO STILES:  The stiles (verticals) were then completed.  Let Dry

6

GRAINING LAYER - APPLY TO REMAINING PANELS

STEP 6 – GRAINING LAYER – APPLY TO REMAINING PANELS : The next morning, the process was repeated by taping off the alternate panels. The panels

7

GRAINING LAYER - APPLY TO RAILS

STEP 7 – GRAINING LAYER – APPLY TO RAILS: The rails (horizontal) were then completed, which are the last section for the first coat. Let Dry

The color matches the approved sample!

8

OVERGLAZING - APPLY GLAZE TO ALTERNATING AREAS

STEP 8 – OVERGLAZING – APPLYING GLAZE TO ALTERNATING AREAS:  The next day, overglaze on alternating areas in the same progression as the previous steps.

The overglazing went quickly using moiré and butterfly techniques in this step.

Friend, student, and Nantucket native, Evita Caune (Riptide Finishes, Inc) helped with the overglazing.

Various Tools were used on the jobsite including Oak Graining Tools, Glazing Brushes, and Spalter Brushes.

9

PROTECT AND FINISH

STEP 9 – PROTECT AND FINISH: Apply Varnish in the desired sheen to protect the finish. GIDP used two coats of a satin varnish to give it a slight sheen finish.

COMPLETED FINISH

Here the two long panels include five wood boards. It is important to pick an odd number within a panel.

See also: Steps for Oak Graining, Oak Graining Tools. Order to Paint a Room, Woodgrain Layout for an Interior Space

 

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