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Degreasing an Oil Basecoat with Whiting – A How To

Types of water-base glaze include reversible (beer glaze) or non-reversible (acrylic Glazing Medium).  When a water-base glaze is applied over an oil basecoat, it can result in unwanted reaction called “beading”.  “Beading” is when the basecoat repels the glaze, causing it to form small bead-like puddles on the surface. The more watery the glaze, then the more it has a tendency to bead (heavier glazes will bead less).  In this post Pierre Finkelstein of Pierre Finkelstein Institute of Decorative Painting shows you how to solve this issue with a technique called “degreasing”.

An example of “beading”

HOW TO CREATE THIS FINISH

Use our step-by-step instruction below

MATERIALS NEEDED:

Here is a list of the tools & supplies you will need to achieve this technique.  Supplies available at fauxbrushes.com are linked below and listed at the bottom of the page.

  • Whiting
  • Water
  • Green Scrubby or Rough Brush
  • 220-grit Sandpaper
1

SAND THE SURFACE

STEP 1 – SAND THE SURFACE:  Sand the surface well with 220-grit sandpaper, using fair amount of pressure.  Dust the surface.  

2

MIX WHITING 2:1

STEP 2 – MIX WHITING 2:1 : Prepare a mixture of whiting and water. Combine 2 parts water with a 1 part of whiting to a container (2:1)

3

DEGREASE THE SURFACE

STEP 3 – DEGREASE THE SURFACE: Add whiting mixture to the surface.

Then, using a scrubby or a rough brush, rub the entire surface energetically and with pressure. Let dry, then wipe off the dried film with a clean, damp sponge.

Materials used

COMPLETED FINISH

Now the surface is ready to glaze without the problem of beading!

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