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Green Campan Marble Columns – A How To

These columns were painted to look like Green Campan Faux Marble.  This was a big job in upstate New York that also included walnut woodgraining on the walls.   Typically, faux marble finishes are completed in a 3-Layer process; 1- background, 2- veining, 3- overglazing, this finish is similar because it requires 3 layers. Pierre Finkelstein, of Grand Illusion Decorative Painting, shows you how he creates this finish below.

HOW TO CREATE THIS FINISH

Use our step-by-step instruction below

MATERIALS NEEDED:

Here is a list of the tools & supplies you will need to achieve this technique.  Supplies available at fauxbrushes.com are linked below and listed at the bottom of the page.

1

BACKGROUND LAYER - APPLY GLAZE

STEP 1 – BACKGROUND LAYER – APPLY GLAZE:   A mixture of glazes was applied in a directional flow using different sizes of Pointed Glazing Brushes. A mother glaze was mixed as a medium-toned glaze that was to be applied throughout the finish.  Additional colors of glazes were mixed but in smaller quantities.  GIDP used Glazing Medium and slow-drying Acrylic Colors to maximize the jobsite working time

Paints used in this faux marble technique are primarily fluid Acrylic Colors with a proportion of Glazing Medium. Depending on how big a project is, the use of slow-dry Acrylic Colors and Glazing Mediums are used to achieve the correct viscosity and open-time.

2

BACKGROUND LAYER - MOTTLE GLAZE

STEP 2 – BACKGROUND LAYER – MOTTLE GLAZE:  Using a Chiqueteur Brush, the colors were mottled while still keeping the colors pure.

See how it looks after this step – it still has a good direction/ flow.

Next, Pierre softened every inch with a Softener Brush. He made sure to blend quickly without leaving brush marks.  A Mini Softener can be used for the corners if needed.

Notice the bold color and directional flow. Let dry.

3

VEINING LAYER - STIPPLE GLAZE

STEP 3 – VEINING LAYER – STIPPLE GLAZE:  After the background layer dried, the following was the veining layer.  A transparent green glaze was generously applied over the dried surface using a domed Glazing Brush.  

Next, the surface was stippled aggressively with a Stippling Brush to break up the glaze. He had to work fast.

4

VEINING LAYER - DISPERSE GLAZE

STEP 4 – VEINING LAYER – DISPERSE GLAZE:   Any Chiqueteur Brush can be used for this next step, but Pierre used a 2-Header Flat Chiqueteur Brush for more control.  Dipping the brush in Denatured Alcohol,  he first dispersed on a palette to distribute evenly on the brush.  Next, he pounced lightly over the freshly glazed surface.  The alcohol creates magical patterns and textures.  Pierre varied his brush marks but kept with the direction of the previous step.  

5

VEINING LAYER - PAINT VEINS

STEP 5:  VEINING LAYER – PAINT VEINS Next, Pierre started the veining process with blue/green thin veins. He preferred to use a stiff bristle Veining Brush for this technique. Let dry.

6

OVERGLAZING - APPLY TEXTURE & VEINS

STEP 6 – OVERGLAZING LAYER – APPLY TEXTURE & VEINS: Next, layer is overglazing,  using a fine Chiqueteur Brush, Pierre created a white, cloudy texture.  

He then added white veins and Fissures using a softer haired Veining Brush.

Use mostly pure white but add a little naples yellow or yellow for variation. For the larger fissures,  he used a single-headed Brecher Brush.

Next, he softened veins in one direction with a round Softener Brush, making sure to not overblend.  Finally, after going back with the transparent green glaze, he then broke up some of the bigger white veins using a 2-Headed Brecher Brush.

8

PROTECT & FINISH

STEP 8:  PROTECT & FINISH  GIDP, then varnished these with a water-based satin Varnish. They rolled the varnish in sections and then “tipped” the varnish with blue nylon Spalter Brush.

COMPLETED FINISH

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