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Moire – A How To

In the context of a tree, a moiré can refer to a type of growth pattern or visual effect that can occur when two or more branches or sets of branches intersect each other at an acute angle. When this happens, the branches can appear to overlap and create a visual distortion.  A moiré (and butterfly) effect is always added on the final overglaze as a negative brush technique

Example of moire motion (positive technique)

In a typical moiré pattern, you can see the horizontal, “chatter” marks. This is a negative technique meaning glaze is dispersed from the surface. Pierre Finkelstein of Pierre Finkelstein Institute of Decorative Painting shows you how he created this finish.

HOW TO CREATE THIS FINISH

Use our step-by-step instruction below

MATERIALS NEEDED:

Here is a list of the tools & supplies you will need to achieve this technique.  Supplies available at fauxbrushes.com are linked below and listed at the bottom of the page.

1

PROPER PREPARATION

STEP 1 – PROPER PREPARATION: Use proper preparation methods to prepare your surface for Step 2.

2

APPLY GLAZE

STEP 2 – APPLY GLAZE:  A mother glaze is mixed as a medium-toned glaze that will be applied throughout the finish.  Typically, this is a glaze used most in a layer.  Additional secondary or tertiary glazes may be mixed, but likely in a smaller quantity.   Paints used in this moiré technique are primarily fluid Acrylic Colors with a proportion of Glazing Medium.  Depending on how big the project is, the use of slow-dry acrylic colors and glazing mediums are used to achieve the correct viscosity and open-time.

3

REMOVE GLAZE WITH QUACK MOTION

Using a Spalter Brush apply the Glazing Medium with a “quack hold”. (see below)

BRUSH HOLD:  Grab the spalter brush like you are making an impression of a duck’s mouth.  Grasp the brush so that the handle is nestled between your thumb and forefinger. As you add marks to the surface, rotate the fingers like you would on a piano to make the shape of the brush change. The Glazing Medium is removed from the surface in rotating marks using a negative technique.  see also:  5 Ways to Hold a Brush

To create a moiré for fiddleback mahogany, a smaller brush with shorter, more compact hair named a Skunk Brush is used.

3

PROTECT AND FINISH

STEP 3 – PROTECT AND FINISH: Apply Varnish in the desired sheen to protect the finish

COMPLETED FINISH

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