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Real Faux Stone – A How To

This is called “real” faux stone because it mimics cut stone and not just a textured surface (which is a common mistake when creating faux stone).  A texture technique may look ok, but it isn’t realistic.  Real, cut stone would be smooth to the touch but pitted (with recesses). Pierre Finkelstein of Pierre Finkelstein Institute of Decorative Painting shows you how to create this finish.

HOW TO CREATE THIS FINISH

Use our step-by-step instruction below

MATERIALS NEEDED:

Here is a list of the tools & supplies you will need to achieve this technique.  Supplies available at fauxbrushes.com are linked below and listed at the bottom of the page.

1

PROPER PREPARATION

STEP 1 – PROPER PREPARATION:  Use proper preparation methods to prepare your surface for Step 2.  Apply a tinted (off-white) Primer. Let dry.

2

ADD TEXTURE

STEP 2 – ADD TEXTURE:  Mix a matte Basecoat (for a chalky texture) with textures Fresco and Weathered Granite.  Apply the mixture with a domed Glazing Brush

Stipple with a refined tool like a 2-header Chiqueteur Brush for a small area. A standard Stippling Brush could be used with a light touch, but the smaller brush allows for excellent control over the texture. Let dry.

3

REPEAT TEXTURE LAYER

STEP 3 – REPEAT TEXTURE LAYER:  Repeat the same process from Step 2 one more time. Let dry & cure.

4

SAND TO FLATTEN

STEP 4 – SAND TO FLATTEN:  Sand with 220 grit Sandpaper to flatten the peaks so it looks like it has pits and feels smooth to the touch.  Don’t over sand.  Always dust after sanding.

5

APPLY TONES TO GLAZE

STEP 5 -APPLY TONES TO GLAZE: A mother glaze was mixed with Acrylic Colors for a cool grey tonality (Raw Umber, Paynes Gray, White).   The glazing liquid was a mixture of 50% sheer Glazing Medium, 30% Matte Medium, and 20% Acrylic Glazing Liquid.  The small baseboard sample did not require a glaze with a long open time.   Decrease the amount of matte medium or acrylic glazing liquid for a longer open time.  Glaze the surface generously but evenly with a pointed Glazing Brush.

Using a palette of raw umber, ultramarine blue, yellow ochre, and the cool grey mother glaze;  create zones of color with a smaller pointed Glazing Brush.  Avoid straight lines with strong color.

Using a 2-Header Flat Chiqueteur Brush, stipple, with enough pressure to melt the tonalities together.

6

REMOVE GLAZE

STEP 6 – REMOVE GLAZE:  Using a samina-haired Chiqueteur Brush loaded with only water and rung out, texture the surface which will dilute the glaze and create texture by removing the glaze. This is a negative technique.

7

ADD WARM TONES OF GLAZE

STEP 7 – ADD WARM TONES OF GLAZE:  Add more warm grey glaze to reinforce the cuts of the stone.

Using a Spattering Brush and a Palette Knife to create a spatter.  Start with raw umber plus water, then switch to burnt umber, and then an off-white.

8

ADD ADDITIONAL OPTIONAL EFFECTS

STEP 8 – ADD ADDITIONAL OPTIONAL EFFECTS:  Paint grout line with an off-white, generally.  Create an illusion of more pits by using a Pointed Detail Brush with a transparent mix of raw umber, ultramarine blue, and white for a cool grey.  Within the pits, add a darker tonality for the shadow on the top part.

Finish the trompe l’oeil grout with a thin shadow and highlight. Let dry.

9

PROTECT & FINISH

STEP 9 – PROTECT & FINISH:  Apply Varnish in the desired sheet to protect the finish (dead flat used).

COMPLETED FINISH

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