Search
Close this search box.

Sculpture Repair And Aging – A How To

Odd jobs come in many shapes and sizes and this one did not disappoint. A recent project of repairing this sculpture and aging it, was the definition of an ODD JOB. This fragile plaster head was shattered in a recent move.

It was the job of GIDP to put humpty dumpty back together again. Pierre Finkelstein of Grand Illusion Decorative Painting shows you how this was accomplished.

HOW TO CREATE THIS FINISH

Use our step-by-step instruction below

MATERIALS NEEDED:

Here is a list of the tools & supplies you will need to achieve this technique.  Supplies available at fauxbrushes.com are linked below and listed at the bottom of the page.

1

GLUE LARGE PIECES

STEP 1 – GLUE LARGE PIECES: The GIDP team had a photo to go by during the gluing process. Using the photo for reference, the pieces were gathered up and the larger pieces were glued together using a well-bond glue. The head was supported with masking tape to keep it together. The smaller pieces were left out since a filler would be used later.

2

STRENGTHEN WITH PLASTER FROM PARIS

STEP 2 – STRENGTHEN WITH PLASTER FROM PARIS: The back of the head needed to be strengthened. So a small batch of plaster of paris was mixed.

3

FILL THE CRACKS

STEP 3 – FILL CRACKS: A Palette Knife was then used to shove as much mixture into the cracks as possible.

Fiberglass mesh squares were added and the plaster mixture was  smeared on top of them to cover the back very well.

On the front of the bust, large cracks were filled with two types of plaster putty (casting and molding refined putty on thoroughly).

Because of the different products being used, it was important that the bust had a consistent substrate in preparation for the aging.  Using a Rondin Brush, a chalky latex paint was painted on thoroughly.

4

FAUX AGING THE SCULPTURE

STEP 4 – FAUX AGING: In preparation for the aging, the sculpture was sealed. Gum arabic as a binder (milk is another binding alternative). The binder was mixed with Glazing Medium (raw umber gouache), to give an aging tonality.

This mixture was applied generously using a Domed Glazing Brush (size 4).

Using the same brush, the mixture was worked into all areas.

A large Codtail Brush was then used to push the glaze into all the crevices. The process was repeated a second time to ensure all areas were aged.

Powdered pigment (rotten earth is the color name) was used for the final aging step. It was applied with a dry Glazing Brush.

The excess was removed with a cotton rag. The aging process was then repeated on the back of the head.

This piece was back to it’s original state and probably a lot more structurally sound.

*Remember – it’s the decorative painter who can do it all — that is the most successful. This is a good example of providing a complete service. Don’t be afraid of any project — show confidence and learn as you go!!

COMPLETED FINISH

FEATURED

PRODUCTS

RELATED POSTS